West Maui community groups show appreciation to Mayor Arakawa

A group presentation to Mayor Arakawa of a Proclamation of Appreciation. From left, Joe Pluta, May Fujiwara, Mrs. Arakawa, Liz May, Mayor Arakawa, Lynn Donovan, Don Lehman, Vivian Ichiki, Theo Morrison, Bob Pure, Pat Endsley, Richard Endsley, Ruth McKay. Photo by Joe Makarewicz of MSI.

A group presentation to Mayor Arakawa of a Proclamation of Appreciation. From left, Joe Pluta, May Fujiwara, Mrs. Arakawa, Liz May, Mayor Arakawa, Lynn Donovan, Don Lehman, Vivian Ichiki, Theo Morrison, Bob Pure, Pat Endsley, Richard Endsley, Ruth McKay. Photo by Joe Makarewicz of MSI.


West Maui Taxpayers Association News Release

During the Jan. 10 West Maui Taxpayers Association (WMTA) annual meeting at the Lahaina Civic Center, nine West Maui community groups proclaimed their appreciation for Mayor Alan M. Arakawa’s support for and interest in West Maui activities.

After a short business meeting to install WMTA directors, WMTA President Don Lehman asked the mayor to come forward for a special presentation. After President Lehman read a West Maui Mid-term Appreciation Proclamation for the mayor, nine representatives of West Maui community groups came forward to express their thanks and to present lei to the mayor and Mrs. Arakawa. The mayor seemed genuinely surprised and gratified.

The groups represented were Lahaina Bypass Now!, Lahaina Complex After School Tutoring Project, Lahaina-Honolua Senior Citizens Club, Lahaina Restoration Foundation, Lahaina Town Action Committee, Rotary Club of Lahaina, Soroptomists International of West Maui, West Maui Improvement Foundation, and the West Maui Taxpayers Association. The Proclamation is posted to the WMTA web site at westmaui.org, and the entire WMTA annual meeting will be rebroadcast several times on Akaku Community Television.

The mayor thanked all the groups for what they do to make West Maui such a unique and extraordinary community. He explained he was especially impressed by the effort to completely remodel the Lahaina Library with no public funding. He continued his remarks with some discussion of his agenda for the coming year. Senator Roz Baker and House Member Angus McKelvey followed the mayor with their legislative updates.

In the special presentations segment of the WMTA annual meeting, Stanford Carr of Stanford Carr Development LLC, gave an update on the Kahoma Village affordable housing project; Joe Pluta, President of the West Maui Improvement Foundation, gave an update on the West Maui hospital; and Charlene Shibuya from the State Department of Transportation presented an update on the bypass and the many DOT projects in West Maui.

WMTA is very proud to be a part of the West Maui community, and to be able to serve as a conduit of information to the community and as an advocate for West Maui. Learn more about WMTA by visiting our website. We encourage anyone who wants to join the effort to promote the WMTA goals and objectives shown on the website to consider joining WMTA. See the website for more information. The investment is small, and will be well spent.

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Basketball boys split two on a weekend trip to Lanai

The Molokai boys basketball team: front, kneeling: Kalei Davis, Ena Victorino; second row: Haaloa Hamakua, Hauoli Faleali'i, Tani Faleali'; third row: Lekeke Schonelly, Kaimana Kahale, Moses Espaniola. Not pictured: Thomas Tamanaha, Paka Adolpho, Dallas Arce, Isaiah Ruiz, Hanalei Dudoit-Enos, Jordan Boswell. Photo courtesy of Hauoli Faleali'i.

The Molokai boys basketball team: front, kneeling: Kalei Davis, Ena Victorino; second row: Haaloa Hamakua, Hauoli Faleali’i, Tani Faleali’; third row: Lekeke Schonelly, Kaimana Kahale, Moses Espaniola. Not pictured: Thomas Tamanaha, Paka Adolpho, Dallas Arce, Isaiah Ruiz, Hanalei Dudoit-Enos, Jordan Boswell. Photo courtesy of Hauoli Faleali’i.


The Molokai High School boys basketball team traveled to Lanai this past weekend and split a pair of games.

The win on Friday and the loss on Saturday left the Farmers with a 6-2 record, second place behind Seabury Hall (6-1) in the Maui Interscholastic League Division II standings.

Hau’oli Faleali’i led the way for Molokai on Friday with 21 points on the way to a 55-51 win over Lanai. David Rapanot helped the effort by hitting five three-pointers to finish with 19 points. The win put the Farmers into a first place tie with Seabury.

But Molokai’s time in first place would be short-lived. The noontime game on Saturday brought Molokai back to second placed after losing 57-50 to the Pine Lads.

The Farmers rallied in the fourth quarter, outscoring Lanai 25-11. But a strong third quarter performance from Lanai was too much. Jestonie Molina hit five 3-pointers on the way to 18 points for the Pine Lads, who now have a 2-6 MIL record.

For Molokai, Paka Adolpho scored 21 points while Faleali’i scored 19 points, who trailed 48-25 after three periods.

NFL players coming to Molokai for one-day football clinic

After just one year of playing league-sanctioned football, Molokai High School will host a football clinic led by former Miami Dolphin standout player Nat Moore.

The clinic — on Jan. 28 from 2-4 p.m. at the MHS football field — is open to all interested youth in grades five through 12. Registration forms can be found at Kilohana School, Kaunakakai School, Maunaloa School, Molokai Middle School, Molokai High School and Kualapuu School. For more information contact Molokai Athletic Department at 567-6959.

Former Miami Dolphins receiver and all-pro player Nat Moore speaks with Molokai High School and Middle School students at The Barn. He will be returning to Molokai to run a one-day clinic Jan. 28.

Former Miami Dolphins receiver and all-pro player Nat Moore speaks with Molokai High School and Middle School students at The Barn. He will be returning to Molokai to run a one-day clinic Jan. 28.


For 13 years, Moore was a standout player for the Miami Dolphins. Moore was a third round pick, played in Super Bowls XVII and XIX, started in the 1977 Pro-Bowl and stands 30th on the all-time career receiving touchdowns list with 74. In 1984 he was name the NFL “Man of the Year,” an honor bestowed on the player who gives outstanding service to his community. He then earned the Byron White Humanitarian Award in 1986 for his service to his team, community and country.

Since retiring from the NFL, Moore continues to dedicate his service to all communities. As the executive director of the Pro Bowl Clinic, he brings NFL stars and children together for fun, football and education. He also has made several appearances on Molokai talking to high school students about his career and offering advice on how to succeed in life.

Joining Moore will be Vince Manuwai, a free agent who played most recently with the Atlanta Falcons, Mercel Reece from the Oakland Raiders and Samantha Ruiz, Miami Dolphins cheerleader.

For more information contact Molokai Athletic Department at 567-6959. Forms are due by Jan. 25. Forms must mailed to: Molokai Athletics, Attn: Hoku Haliniak, P.O. Box 158, Hoolehua, HI 96729.

Event today commemorates 120 years since overthrow of Hawaii: ‘Ua Mau Ke Ea: Sovereignty Endures’

The Alu Like Native Hawaiian library in Hoolehua will be the site of today's open house and event.

The Alu Like Native Hawaiian library in Hoolehua will be the site of today’s open house and event.


Today represents the 120th anniversary of the overthrow of the lawful Hawaiian government. The Hawaiian sovereignty movement still moves forward politically through the reinstated government and through education, such as the Alu Like-sponsored event going on today.

The Alu Like Native Hawaiian library is sponsoring an open house and event, “Ua Mau Ke Ea: Sovereignty Endures” today from 4–6 p.m. The library is located on the hill behind Lanikeha and the Hoolehua Fire Station.

Guest speaker Dr. David Keanu Sai will offer a Powerpoint presentation from 5-6 p.m. that will revisit the history of the 120 years since the overthrow of the Hawaiian government.

The presentation will be based on historical documents intended to educate the public. (Views expressed by the speaker do not represent the views of Alu Like’s Native Hawaiian library.)

The event is open to the public and provides informational services to Native Hawaiians and others interested in the history, culture and contributions of Native Hawaiians. Help with genealogy is available as is WiFi access. Pupus, music and free giveaways will also take place at the event.

The library is open during limited hours. For more information, call K. Nani Kawa`a at 285-4548 or 560-5466.

Molokai Properties finalizes gift of 1,719 acres at Mokio Preserve to Molokai Land Trust

Shoreline along Mokio Point on Molokai's north shore between Mo’omomi Preserve and Ilio Point will receive permanent preservation protection.

Shoreline along Mokio Point on Molokai’s north shore between Mo’omomi Preserve and Ilio Point will receive permanent preservation protection.


Molokai Land Trust (MLT) has received the deed to 1,719 acres of some of the most pristine and environmentally sensitive land on Molokai, which was gifted by Molokai Properties Limited (MPL) in April 2008.

Known as the Mokio Preserve, the land stretches along the north shore of Molokai between Mo’omomi Preserve boundary and the State’s Ilio Point parcel. The Mokio Preserve comprises five miles of spectacular, remote and rugged coastline and is now known as environmentally significant lands.

In 2008, MPL signed a Letter of Agreement to transfer Mokio to MLT. Under the terms of the agreement, the Land Trust will retain ownership of the land in conservation in perpetuity. As well in 2009, MLT signed a 99-year lease so they could develop plans and begin land restoration. Over four years were needed to complete the subdivision and due diligence to complete the land in fee simple transfer.

The rugged Mokio Point shoreline.

The rugged Mokio Point shoreline.


The Mokio Preserve is a diamond in the rough with significant subsistence gathering areas and an extensive tidal pool system as well as numerous koa or fishing shrines intact with offerings. The area has large ancient adze quarries and habitat complexes. The ecosystem includes bird-nesting locations and over an acre of ‘ihi ‘ihi lauakea, estimated to be the largest remaining site of this endangered endemic Hawaiian fern in the islands.

During the last four years, MLT partnered with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, The Cooke Foundation, Hawaii Community Foundation, The Omidyar Ohana Fund, Maui Economic Opportunity’s AmeriCorps Program, and The Nature Conservancy, to begin dune restoration at Anapuka near the state’s Ilio Point boundary.

MLT also partnered with USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and its Plant Materials Center to restore wildlife habitat and reduce erosion on its interior lands marked by bare patches of red earth. The organization is now looking at protecting Mokio’s unique seasonal wetlands in partnership with the USDA NRCS.

An access system has been implemented for island residents, which supports traditional subsistence activities. Contractors were hired in 2009 to assess and provide reports on the botanical, cultural/archaeological and marine resources within the preserve boundaries.

Information provided through these contractor reports formed the basis for a long-range management plan, which was completed in 2012. Archaeological resources have been documented, with the help of an archaeologist, and staff has followed up on recommendations for invasive species removal from these sites to prevent further damage to stone structures.

In 2010, MLT hired an EOD contractor to sweep for and remove military ordnance in the Anapuka area, as well as all major trails, roads, and restoration sites on the preserve. Then MLT partnered with local schools to provide service-learning opportunities and introduce a part of Molokai that most students had never seen before. Development of a native plant nursery has enabled the organization to produce thousands of plants for its ongoing restoration projects at Mokio, and both children and adults are actively involved in the restoration work.

“The land transfer to the Trust is evidence of MPL’s commitment to partner with community-based groups to protect significant legacy lands,” said Rikki Cooke, president of the MLT Board of Trustees.

The Molokai Land Trust was formed in 2006, and is now recognized by the State of Hawaii and the federal government as a non-profit organization with the stated mission, “to protect and restore land, natural and cultural resources of Molokai and to perpetuate the unique Native Hawaiian traditions of the island for the benefit of future generations of all Molokai, particularly Native Hawaiians.”

Cooke concluded, “Now we own the land, and we can expand our efforts to preserve and restore Mokio for future generations.”

Molokai residents energized by Alternative Energy Festival

Quechan Tribal members at the Mitchell Pau'ole Center on Friday, from left, Lucinda Polk, Vernon Smith, Lucia Polk and Allen Paquin, a Navajo Tribal member. These tribal members told the story of how they have fought Big Wind projects in the deserts of Southern California.

Quechan Tribal members at the Mitchell Pau’ole Center on Friday, from left, Lucinda Polk, Vernon Smith, Lucia Polk and Allen Paquin, a Navajo Tribal member. These tribal members told the story of how they have fought Big Wind projects in the deserts of Southern California.



I Aloha Molokai News Release

The Mitchell Pau’ole Center in Kaunakakai transformed into an alternative energy learning center for over 500 people this past weekend at the second annual Alternative Energy Festival.

On Friday and Saturday, those in attendance learned to construct solar water heaters; how to do a no-cost energy audit; learned about a home’s costly vampire energy; compared options for buying or leasing a home PV system; and listened to panels discuss alternative generation options so that Molokai can wean itself off of fossil fuel. Participants also reflected on future challenges they will face if the Big Wind project or undersea cable project moves ahead and discussed Molokai “home rule” at the I Aloha Molokai-sponsored festival.

Helen Wai teaches energy conservation as a process of money management.

Helen Wai teaches energy conservation as a process of money management.


Exhibitors shared information on a variety of topics, including: energy saving devices, changing habits, a tree giveaway, biking as transportation, sustainable food, recycled products and new financing programs to help Molokai families install PV panels without a huge financial investment upfront.

“New programs for residential PV make solar more affordable for Molokai families and people on fixed incomes to stabilize their electrical bills,” said Matt Yamashita, Rising Sun.

Entertainment delighted the crowd. The Quechan Tribe representatives from Ocotillo, Calif. enthralled the audience throughout the festival with haunting chants and flute solos. Quechan members, Lucinda and Lucia Polk, demonstrated a Native American dance while Quechan Tribal Administrator Vernon Smith chanted. Allen Paquin, a Navajo Tribal member, played the flute with soothing songs about birds and the love of family. Office of Hawaiian Affairs Chair, Colette Machado, officially welcomed the tribal representatives Friday evening and presented them with a Hawaiian artifact.

Darlene Toth grows and donates trees.

Darlene Toth grows and donates trees.


The Saturday morning panel topics was called “State and County Energy Initiatives.” Members consisted of Henry Curtis, Life of the Land; Pat Gagin, Kauai Island Utility Cooperative; Robin Kaye, Friends of Lanai; and Doug Macleod, Energy Commissioner, Maui County Energy Office.

Molokai spends $13 million annually on electricity and gasoline.

“If Molokai becomes energy self-sufficient, then millions of dollars would be kept circulating on island versus offshore,” said Curtis. “Current HECO’s Integrated Resource Planning Advisory Committee is focused on Oahu generation and not solving neighbor island generation concerns; therefore, Molokai will have to plan its own energy future,” said Robin Kaye.

Gagin provided an overview of how Kauai bought its island utility and how an energy cooperative operates with major input from both cooperative members and customers.

Guest speaker Harry Kim, former Mayor of Hawaii Island, reminded residents that government is “our” government and adults have a responsibility to make good decisions with the next generation in mind. “Decisions today will determine the future for many generations,” said Kim.

Allen Paquin, a Navajo Tribal member, plays a moving song on his flute.

Allen Paquin, a Navajo Tribal member, plays a moving song on his flute.


The second panel consisted of the five members of the Quechan Tribe and their opposition to a Big Wind project in Ocotillo. Already several years into the skirmish, the Quechan tribe is refusing community benefits and is now suing the Big Wind developer. The developer is proposing to destroy sacred cultural areas and the ancestral home of many tribe members. These tribe members are currently fighting against the same Big Wind developer as the Big Wind project proposed for Molokai.

The afternoon panel members focused on energy and island independence and consisted of Moses Haia, staff attorney for Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation; Dr. Noa Emmett Aluii, practicing physician on Molokai and long-term activist for Native rights; Naalehua Anthony, Native Hawaiian Roll Commission; and Kaleikoa Kaeo, University of Hawaii, Maui Community College.

The panel agreed that issues in one place in Hawaii have impacts on all places because of precedent. As well, a sense of urgency exists because parts of Hawaiian culture can be lost forever if inappropriate choices are made today. The main advice: Molokai must plan its future and plan it wisely.

The last panel focused on energy alternatives and included Henry Curtis; Davianna McGregor, professor and founding member of Ethnic Studies at University of Hawaii, Manoa; Pat Schellerup, Lite Solar Corporation; and Robert Petricci, Pele Defense Fund.

Participants agreed that decentralized generation with rooftop solar is in Molokai’s immediate future and other fuels, such as biofuels, could be one of several nighttime generation options. To do this type of planning, the community, and especially Hawaiians, need to be at the table versus just government bodies.

I Aloha Molokai (IAM) is a grassroots, all-volunteer organization formed to oppose the industrial wind turbines and undersea cable proposed for Molokai. The group supports renewable energy projects but insists that theses projects protect the environment, respect native Hawaiian culture, provide reliable energy at affordable cost, and are supported by the community. The work of IAM involves not just advocacy but public education through films, forums and community outreach on Molokai, around the state and throughout the world.

Kalaupapa celebrates sainthood of Marianne Cope, ‘beloved mother of outcasts’

Bishop of Honolulu Larry Silva leads the celebratory mass for Saint Marianne Cope. He is surrounded by visiting bishops.

Bishop of Honolulu Larry Silva leads the celebratory mass for Saint Marianne Cope. He is surrounded by visiting bishops.


During Saturday’s Kalaupapa celebration of Saint Marianne Cope, Bishop of Honolulu Larry Silva described the young Marianne as a “rising star” in the Catholic Church.
Saint Marianne Cope

Saint Marianne Cope


At almost the same moment, the looming cliffs above Kalaupapa, shrouded in thick clouds, broke clear as a ray of sun forced its way through. While perhaps not a miracle of intercession, the crowd of about 400 people was grateful for the break in the weather until the celebratory mass concluded.

The event represented the official Kalaupapa celebration of the Oct. 21 canonization of Mother Marianne in Rome. Many observers, including Molokai native and National Park Service Law Enforcement Ranger Amy Sakurada, said it was even larger than the gathering in Kalaupapa to celebrate the sainthood of Father Damien three years earlier.

An elegant hula performance, with the Iolani Hawaii Suzuki Strings in the background.

An elegant hula performance, with the Iolani Hawaii Suzuki Strings in the background.


The Kalaupapa settlement, home to about 10 surviving Hansen’s disease patients, handled the mass influx of visitors beautifully. All morning, one after another, small planes landed at the Kalaupapa Airport to bring in bishops, deacons, families of patients and Catholic fans of Saint Marianne from around the world. Even the pali trail, three miles of steep and muddy switchbacks from topside Molokai, had more foot traffic than it had seen in years.

Visitors were welcomed to Bishop Home by rangers of Kalaupapa National Historical Park with the sounds of Iolani Hawaii Suzuki Strings Tour Group playing in the background. Music from the St. John Vianney Choir also helped create an atmosphere of celebration.

Mass began at 10 a.m. with a welcoming from NPS Superintendent Steve Prokop who turned it over to Bishop Silva for acknowledgements of the special guests. These included the Most Reverend Carlo Maria Vigano, Apostolic Nuncio to the United States; Archbishop of New York Timothy Cardinal Dolan, president of the United States Conferences of Catholic Bishops; Most Reverend Robert Cunningham, Bishop of Syracuse; and the Most Reverend Peter Paul Yelezuome Angkyier, Bishop of Damingo, Ghana, West Africa.

An especially elegant hula performance was followed by comments by Bishop Silva on the life of Marianne Cope. Born in 1838, Marianne served as a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities, based in Syracuse, N.Y. before arriving in Hawaii. Extending the “rising star” metaphor, Bishop Silva said that Marianne, “knew instinctively that the best stars lead to journeys of adventure.”

His Eminence Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York, at Saturday's mass.

His Eminence Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York, at Saturday’s mass.


Marianne entered religious life in 1862 in Syracuse and came to Hawaii in 1883 to provide health care to patients with Hansen’s disease, commonly known as leprosy. She arrived in Kalaupapa in 1888, about a year after Father Damien died of Hansen’s disease. Upon arriving in Kaluapapa, following in the footsteps of Father Damien. Marianne, “quickly changed it to a place of light, dignity and joy.”

Remaining humble throughout her days, Marianne, “became smaller as God became larger,” Silva continued. “She found Jesus in those who were truly confined on the rough cross of Kalaupapa.”

To this day, the Sisters of St. Francis continue Marianne’s work in Kalaupapa. Sister Roberta Smith from the Sisters of St. Francis spoke about Marianne’s significance. “Because of her courage we are all here today. She had the ability to respond to isolated people … Her example of self-sacrifice and love speaks to use over the centuries. Let us enjoy our day together in the blessed and sacred place.”

Nuncio Vigano spoke about what made the day special. “Marianne had a heart so great she was able to spend her whole life in charity … For me this day is very special, the way the people of Hawaii recognize the gift of what has been given them.”

Representing the Kalaupapa Patient Advisory Council, Gloria Marks spoke with much gratitude. A patient there for most of her life, Marks, and her late husband Richard Marks, started Damien Tours, the company that still, every day, allows visitors a glimpse into the history and life of Kalaupapa. Richard Marks is also responsible for starting the movement to turn Kalaupapa into a national park in the 1980s.

Marks thanked the bishops and sisters for allowing the patients to make a second visit to Rome to witness the canonization. She was particularly impressed with the reception she received when visiting Syracuse prior to traveling to Rome. “You put on quite a show,” said Marks, “Are you trying to show up Saint Damien,” she said, with a grin.

Mass concluded with the song, “Saint Marianne.” This was followed by a celebratory lu’au at McVeigh Hall. Next to McVeigh Hall was a pictorial history of St. Marianne. Memorabilia was for sale by Pacific Historic Parks.

In the play "November's Song," Mother Marianne can be seen ministering to Father Damien who had recently been stricken with leprosy.

In the play “November’s Song,” Mother Marianne can be seen ministering to Father Damien who had recently been stricken with leprosy.


Just as the lu’au concluded — featuring a wide variety of traditional Hawaiian foods freshly prepared — the rain began.

Visitors were shuttled to the newly renovated Paschoal Hall for a performance of the play “November’s Song.” Told from the point of view of Marianne, the play recounts her travels to Hawaii and her decision to take on the challenge of serving the leprosy patients of Kalaupapa.

Many of the turning points in Marianne’s life took place in November. She talks about how her adventure began as an administrator at St. Joseph Hospital in Syracuse and the decisions that brought her to the Sandwich Isles for the first time. Marianne is played with great conviction by Eva Andrade. The play is directed by Deacon Modesto Cordero, who also plays Damien.

A second performance was offered later in the day for those who were not leaving Kalauapapa on Saturday.